A living room design with John Lewis products

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This design was made in answer to a made up brief for John Lewis. The brief outlined the size of the room and the wants and needs of the clients. Here is the brief in short; warm tones, show off the victorian oak floorboards, to include an office area, spaces to display photographic work, be able to be used by all five family members and a stylish design. Above is the initial mood board of spaces, products and colour combinations

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After finding existing images that I thought related to the space and the clients brief I then grouped a collection of colours, patterns and materials for the space and looked at how they could work together.

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Having chosen the colour scheme and taken a look at the materials and patterns available within John Lewis the next step was to look at the products  in the grey and yellow colours chosen and that will go within the space. The above two boards show the various products that would work and the options for accessories and furniture for the room.

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These next two boards show the chosen furniture for the room. Starting to group them together and layer the materials and patterns on top of each other.

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Having chosen the furniture the next step was putting them together within the context of the room. Creating these visuals with the use of Autocad and Photoshop. The above image and below three show the views of the different walls and placement of the furniture in relation to the space. These visuals also show the suggested arrangement of the photo frames on the walls.

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The final below board shows some very simple 3d visuals of the room and an Autocad plan of the room. The time frame for this project was very short, if I had more time to work on this project these final visuals would be more detailed and engaging rather than the blocky simple images they currently are.

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We really enjoyed working on this project and hope you like what we designed!

Bethvictoria.com

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Rauschenberg at the Tate Modern

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One of the current exhibitions at the Tate Modern is a large retrospective of Robert Rauschenberg’s 6o year career as an artist. Through 11 gallery spaces you are shown the journey of his work from his early experimentation to his late work with all the seemingly random and continuously experimental work in-between.

We went to visit it and so wanted to let you know what we thought. This is written with two people opinions. Beth’s (B) who is the designer and artist behind Bethvictoria.com and Paul (P) a lover of art and design but with a business background. We thought it would be interesting to see the two opinions formed from the pieces.

The first two pieces are found in the first, ‘Experimentation’ room of the exhibition. This room shows the work he created within Black Mountain College where he took classes in the fine arts and the initial works he created during his marriage to Susan Weil. ‘Experimentation’ shows various materials he worked with from light sensitive paper to a car, paint and paper.

Automobile Tire Print, 1953
Automobile Tire Print, 1953

About: Created with the help of composer John Cage and his Model A Ford. The piece challenges the idea of art and authorship.

What we thought

B: A simplistic idea and kind of print. For me it shows the trace that we leave. Even the simple day to day things that we do, like driving a car, change the world around us and leave a print. A comment on society.

P: I like this for its simplicity, but technically this probably isn’t as straightforward as one might think. Keeping all the sheets of paper accurately juxtaposed achieving a smooth substrate to minimise counter-imprints from under the paper, and ensuring the tire was loaded with sufficient paint to get the consistency of impression over what looks like to revolutions of the car wheel, would have been challenges to overcome.

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Untitled, 1951

About: Part of a body of work named Black Paintings created to test the boundaries of abstraction in the 50s. Untitled, 1951, created whilst he was studying, uses layers of newspaper and dense black paint to create a textured and glossy painting.

What we thought

B: The texture of the newspaper isn’t obvious until you get closer to this piece. That’s what I find interesting about this piece. From far away it just looks like black canvas but when you get closer you see that there’s texture and movement with how the light plays on the glossy paint. If you don’t look at it properly you don’t see the detail and it doesn’t make sense.

P: This is moody. The exhibition lighting could, to my mind, have created more atmosphere. Rauschenberg probably approached this from an experimental angle and discovered an abstraction of form and colour that worked. The proportions are comfortable to the eye and I like the emphasis that is given to the abutment of the varying width canvases that make up the whole.

In room three of the exhibition you find the ‘Combines’. Combining materials, objects and processes to create works that he said became ‘awkward physically’. Using mostly found objects which he put on canvas and then enhanced with abstract paint marks. The combines were made in his studio, live on stage and also some grew with their time in exhibition via viewer participation.

Bed, 1955
Bed, 1955

About: Not being able to afford canvas Rauschenberg decided to use his quilt, sheet and pillow for this piece. When it was first viewed it was considered a threatening piece, Rauschenberg said that he did not mean for it it be harsh.

What we thought

B: I wouldn’t say it looks cozy. But I do relate to it. To me its the boundary between being awake and dreaming. The cover at the bottom and pillow at the top are practically untouched – the real uniform world we are in when we are awake. And the part where you would slip under the cover is messy and colourful – the explosion of your ideas and imagination that comes when you are asleep and dreaming.

P: Not a lot to say about this other than I think it is great. I particularly like the almost ‘impressionist’ colour spectrum that is created around the fold of the quilt.

Black Market, 1961
Black Market, 1961

About: Originally this was a piece that the audience could participate in. The four clipboards on the canvas were for viewers to put their own pieces of art/notes or doodles into the work. The box contained objects and people were encouraged to take one in exchange for an object of their own. (This was stopped when in one exhibition the objects were taken and not replaced)

What we thought

B: The idea of being able to add to and interact with this piece is really great. I love the idea that Rauschenberg took his recognition and allowed other people to get involved with it. Collaborating with everyone and getting everyone involved in making art.

P: I would love to know if Rauschenberg took an interest in how the contents of the box changed over time. Keeping snapshots of the ever-changing range of items, with the common theme of having been ‘swapped in’ might have been the basis for more follow-on work perhaps.

Silkscreens (Room 5) were a key part in Rauschenberg’s recognition as an artist, being the key to his breakthrough in 1963. Rauschenberg was working on these at the same time as Warhol. He started using his own imagery then he developed to using colour and more recognisable found imagery, touching on the subjects of politics, science and sport. Once his silkscreens had been recognised and shown within galleries he immediately destroyed the tools needed to make any more, removing any possibility of the ease to just repeat himself.

Almanac, 1962
Almanac, 1962

About: Almanac was one of his first screen prints and doesn’t hold any real meaning. It is just an exploration of the combination of imagery, strokes and textures.

What we thought

B: Unlike Warhol, Rauschenberg’s screen prints aren’t concerned with the celebrity. They are, as with his other work, experimental and show working. It doesn’t tell you what it is or how you should think about it – you decide for yourself.

P: At first, this piece creates an internal struggle in the observer as it appears chaotic (Tate calls it ‘poetic’ – I’m not so sure). But as one deciphers the images that have been screen printed and the brush work that is added for emphasis, one is taken on a journey of one’s own making. The piece becomes something different to each observer.

Room 11 shows Rauschenberg’s late works. He had a keen interest in using the latest technology in photography to produce large scale works. He continued to make work until his death in 2008. They continued to be collaborative and experimental. Questioning the idea of art and ownership and the development in technology, media and culture.

Mirthday Man, 1997
Mirthday Man, 1997

About: Mirthday Man was made on Rauschenberg’s 72nd birthday. It includes an x-ray of himself, clippings from art history and imagery from his travels.

What we thought

B: From the exhibition it seemed that Rauschenberg after time creating less colourful box, B&W photographs and installations went back to this type of work that is similar to his screen prints but with modern techniques. I just love that even on his 72nd birthday and for ten more years he was creating such interesting works.

P: It seems a random combination of images, but it isn’t. I imagine the artist anguishing over the arrangement of colour, shape and topic, either to give some order to it all, or to intentionally create disharmony. This is a piece one can look at for hours and see different things and think different things.

So, that’s what we thought about it. The exhibition is open till 2 April 2017 so get down to Tate to see it for yourself!

Bethvictoria.com

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We’re in a gang… The Papergang

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We love stationary.

Papergang is a monthly subscription of stationary with the online stationary store Ohh deer.

This subscription of dreams is having a little bundle of useful notebooks, beautiful designs and funny cards through your letterbox (box doesn’t actually fit through letterbox) and its pretty easy and reasonably priced to get this in your life.

Heres the kind of items we’ve received in past boxes:

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The 2017 palm print diary is our lifeline to keeping track of what we need to do in the day and we’ve framed the prints and some of the cards and put them up in the bedroom. Every month is a lovely little surprise and always full of beautiful stationary you didn’t know you needed!

Follow this link – Papergang – and sign yourself up! Get in quick to get this months box!

Stationary boxes in the post – what a time to be alive.

Bethvictoria.com

All images from Papergang website
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We’ve learnt some stuff and we’re growing

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Having completed MA Interior and Spatial Design (see the work in this blog post) and some work experience with big design firms we feel like we’ve learnt some stuff.

Bethvictoria.com are now taking on some interior design projects as well as the wallpaper and wall coverings. We’ve got a couple on the go but are always happy to talk to anyone about any projects from tiny to huge that we may be able to help with!

Heres a little recap of what we offer:

Wallpaper

Two variations available in two different colours, part of  the 2014 originals collection.

Find them on our Etsy page: Outline and Full bird

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Murals

A hand painted service currently available in the Berkshire and London area. Contact info@bethvictoria.com for any enquiries of this service.

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Prints and art

Photographic prints. As well as Interior and Spatial design we also studied Photography and have a small collection of our images available as prints on our website and Etsy.

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We also have a small limited edition amount of crayon art. Available in three different sizes and can be found on our Etsy site too.

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Interior and Spatial Design

We’re at the very early stages of the two interiors projects we have on at the moment. So heres a sample of our Masters work and a design for a seating area done as part of work experience.

Hopefully this space will get filled up with a variety of spatial, residential and hospitality interior design in the not too distant future! Again contact info@bethvictoria.com for any more information.

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Watch out for blog posts on the projects progress in the not too distant future!

Bethvictoria.com

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The velvet trend

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We’ve read from the people that know that one big trend during 2017 will be velvet! Whilst collecting images of various velvet containing rooms we saw a definite pattern in big blue comfy sofas and chairs. Blue is predicted to be within a lot of interiors this year and it would seem this relates back to the velvet trend.

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Inspired by this velvet comfiness we have found a few options that you can get in your home. From chunky sofas to sophisticated cocktail chairs and lush throws – we’ve got all the velvet bases covered.

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Here are a collection of velvety goodness that you can get into your own home. Go for these varied colours or stick with the predicted blue theme for the year (most items available in multiple colours).

Find them here: 1) Velvet love tub 2) Velvet Throw  3) Fitz  4) Lula  5) Frame 6) Tub 7) Scott               8) Margot  9) Margot Single  10) Chesterfield 

Bethvictoria.com

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Chairs are architecture, sofas are bourgeois – Le Corbusier

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This is simply about our love of mid century modern arm chairs. Just look at them. They shouldn’t, and in some of these cases aren’t, be considered a piece that goes only within a mid-century modern themed room. Gentle coloured upholstering goes with a light Scandinavian feel and darker greys work well with a more industrial style.

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They’re beautiful. So we’ve found some that can be purchased. We want them all.

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Available here: 1) Danish oak  2) z-chairs 3) Wooden Green 4) Danish armchair 5) Bailey 6) Karla

 Hope you like these chairs as much as we do!

Bethvictoria.com

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Copper for the home

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Metallics in the home look perfect. The current trend is to swap out the cold, plain metals for warm and reflective coppers and rose golds. They can be used all around the house from a simple light in a bedroom to copper pans and storage in a kitchen.

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The selection of images we’ve found above are all about the warm metal accessories. Taking ideas and reference from this collection we’ve found some beautiful items, in a range of prices, for your home.

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Find them here: 1) Moon Wall Hook  2) Kitchen Hook Rack  3) Averly Circle Mirror    4) Concrete and Copper Pendant Light  5) Drip Plate  6) Audny Jars  7) SLATTBO  8) HASSLAROD  9) VINDKARE               10) Wire Basket Side Table  11) Wall Planter  12) Desk Lamp  13) Tripod Table

Thanks for reading! Bethvictoria.com

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Arthur Streeton – A master impressionist

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Earlier this month, we attended a wonderful exhibition at The National Gallery titled ‘Australia’s Impressionists’ which runs to 26th March 2017. This is a relatively small exhibition, but expertly curated and features work by four Australian artists – Tom Roberts, Charles Conder, John Russell and Arthur Streeton. Between them, these four created a new artistic movement in Australia based on what they had seen in France and produced a huge combined body of work that represents the very best of impressionist painting from the prodigious talents that Roberts, Conder and Russell are, it was the work of Arthur Streeton (1867-1943) that captured our attention.

This from The National Gallery’s web page summarises his life.

“Streeton’s artistic training began aged 15, with night classes in design at Melbourne’s National Gallery School, while he worked as an office clerk and, later, as an apprentice lithographer. He read amateur art manuals imported from Europe and America that encouraged painting en plein air.

 While painting at Mentone Beach, south of Melbourne, Streeton met Tom Roberts (1856–1931), who invited him to join artists’ camps that he had helped found in the bush near Box Hill, to the west of the city. Together with Roberts and Charles Conder (1868–1909), Streeton helped stage the ‘9 by 5 Impression Exhibition‘ in Melbourne in 1889, which served as something of a manifesto for this new generation of Australian painters who were embracing the looser, more open techniques of Impressionism.

Streeton moved to Sydney in 1890, after the Art Gallery of New South Wales purchased a large canvas of his, ‘Still glides the stream, and shall for ever glide’ (1890). He was the first Australian-born artist to have a work exhibited at London’s Royal Academy – ‘Golden Summer, Eaglemont’ (1889) – but when he moved to London in 1897 he struggled to gain recognition. Nonetheless, he stayed in England for around thirty years, sending work back to Australia.

During the First World War, Streeton served as a hospital orderly in London, and then as an official war artist with the Australian army. He was awarded a knighthood in 1937 for services to art.”

Streeton produced a tremendous body of work during his lifetime, everyone of which merits individual study. But for now we have selected five paintings from the exhibition for specific comment and appreciation. As you study them, take in the balance in the composition, the great sense of location and climate, and the wonderful colour palettes he uses, all of which can inform ebullient design solutions today.

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‘Golden Summer, Eaglemont’ 1889. Oil on canvas.

This painting is many things, but we specifically love the colour palette Streeton uses. Vivid blues and golds which he describes as the ‘nature’s scheme of colour in Australia’. The depth of detail, the tranquil setting and the mastery of light and shade all stand out.

Artist : Ena Joyce (Australia, b.1925) Title : Date : (circa 1949) Medium Description: oil on plywood Dimensions : Credit Line : Purchased 1949 Image Credit Line : Accession Number : 832

‘Fire’s on’ Lapstone Tunnel 1891 oil on canvas.

Again that wonderful colour palette stands out. Up close, his use of a 1″ brush in 1-2″ strokes to build up the tonal range of the blue sky is masterful. The vantage point produces a high horizon allowing an exquisite interpretation of sunlight and shade, as seen in Golden Summer. You almost want to reach out and touch the rocks on the left!

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‘Ariadne’ 1895 oil on wood panel.

Blue and pink dominate the colours here. Ariadne appears to almost float on the sand. With her head lowered into her hands, her sorrow easily felt. Again the sense of sunshine and warm climate is projected so well.

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‘Blue Pacific’ 1890 oil on canvas.

This image doesn’t do justice to the tonal range and brush work that Streeton achieved. The light and dark golds used to pull out the centrepiece sandstone cliff face are superbly constructed. Again the colour palette is excellent and exuberant.

Artist : Arthur Streeton (Australia, b.1867, d.1943) Title : Date : 1893 Medium Description: oil on canvas Dimensions : Credit Line : Gift of Lady Denison 1942 Image Credit Line : Accession Number : 7209

‘The railway station, Redfern’ 1893 oil on canvas.

Finally, we bring this one into the selection because of its juxtaposition in climatic terms to the prior four. Here, grey skies, wind and rain predominate instead of warm sunshine. The composition, with all the detail clustered in the top half of the painting, and just the surface treatment and a lone be-coated person and their shadow occupying the lower half, represent such an eye for the scene. It is reported that he painted this in around three hours…

Celebrate the work of Arthur Streeton. He has many lessons to teach modern designers.

Written by Paul Smith for Bethvictoria.com

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The perfect study …

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…to beat the back to work blues

For this post we started by collating a load of images of studies that we could work in. They mostly consist of a lot of light and storage options. It is so easy to let piles build up on your desk and the light to go down whilst working through to the night so hopefully this will help!

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Whether your study is just a simple desk or a whole room the items we have found will add a little extra organisation, motivation or fun to the space. Hopefully making work deadlines or exam prep a little more do-able.

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Find them here:

1) Shelf support  2) Eames style chair  3) Retro letter peg board  4) Marble table lamp  5) LILLASEN  6) EKBY ALEX  7) Retro desk lamp  8) Steel and wood floor lamp  9) Wire wall grid  10) Loft desk   11) Wire magazine rack  12) Weekly planner wall sticker

Bethvictoria.com

All images collected from Pinterest or listed product pages.
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2017 Homely home tips

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For this set of tips we’re starting at the front door.

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1) Christmas, New Year and winter time normally means clutter, winter dirt and leaves. Keeping the front door area and hall clear will make arriving home easy and something to look forward to and give guests a great first impression. Plants in the hallway are a great way to add colour and freshness to space.

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2) Eye lines. Statement pieces or vibrantly painted walls can work as a great way to lead you through a house. This idea guides people into a certain room or space using their eyes and makes them want to stay and explore a little longer.

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3) Plants, plants and more plants. We’ve definitely said this before. Plants are a great way to get colour, textures and shapes into your home. They also keep the spaces fresh and airy.

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4) Good smells. Keep the house smelling fresh and cozy. Whilst its still (sort of) the season light any festive candles that you’ve got or been given or get baking.

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5) Make it yours with small unique decorations and deign details. For example, put your own artwork on the walls or items that remind you of a good time or childhood memory.

Making something homely takes all of your senses. Not just snuggling under a warm blanket. So with these tips hopefully you can hit all five and feel homely from the time you see your front door.

Bethvictoria.com

All pictures found on Pinterest.
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